What the US health care system assumes about you | Mitchell Katz
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What the US health care system assumes about you | Mitchell Katz


A few years ago, I was taking care of a woman
who was a victim of violence. I wanted her to be seen in a clinic
that specialized in trauma survivors. I made the appointment myself because,
being the director of the department, I knew if I did it, she would get an appointment right away. The clinic was about an hour and a half
away from where she lived. But she took down the address
and agreed to go. Unfortunately, she didn’t
make it to the clinic. When I spoke to the psychiatrist,
he explained to me that trauma survivors are often resistant to dealing with the difficult
issues that they face and often miss appointments. For this reason, they don’t generally allow the doctors
to make appointments for the patients. They had made a special exception for me. When I spoke to my patient, she had a much simpler
and less Freudian explanation of why she didn’t go to that appointment: her ride didn’t show. Now, some of you may be thinking, “Didn’t she have some other way
of getting to that clinic appointment?” Couldn’t she have taken an Uber
or called another friend? If you’re thinking that, it’s probably because you have resources. But she didn’t have
enough money for an Uber, and she didn’t have
another friend to call. But she did have me, and I was able to get her
another appointment, which she kept without difficulty. She wasn’t resistant, it’s just that her ride didn’t show. I wish I could say that this
was an isolated incident, but I know from running
the safety net systems in San Francisco, Los Angeles,
and now New York City, that health care is built
on a middle-class model that often doesn’t meet the needs
of low-income patients. That’s one of the reasons
why it’s been so difficult for us to close the disparity
in health care that exists along economic lines, despite the expansion of health insurance under the ACA, or Obamacare. Health care in the United States assumes that, besides getting across
the large land expanse of Los Angeles, it also assumes that you
can take off from work in the middle of the day to get care. One of the patients who came
to my East Los Angeles clinic on a Thursday afternoon presented with partial
blindness in both eyes. Very concerned, I said to him, “When did this develop?” He said, “Sunday.” I said, “Sunday? Did you think of coming sooner to clinic?” And he said, “Well, I have to work
in order to pay the rent.” A second patient to that same clinic, a trucker, drove three days with a raging infection, only coming to see me
after he had delivered his merchandise. Both patients’ care was jeopardized
by their delays in seeking care. Health care in the United States
assumes that you speak English or can bring someone with you who can. In San Francisco, I took care of a patient
on the inpatient service who was from West Africa
and spoke a dialect so unusual that we could only find one translator
on the telephonic line who could understand him. And that translator only worked
one afternoon a week. Unfortunately, my patient needed
translation services every day. Health care in the United States
assumes that you are literate. I learned that a patient of mine
who spoke English without accent was illiterate, when he asked me to please sign
a social security disability form for him right away. The form needed to go
to the office that same day, and I wasn’t in clinic, so trying to help him out, knowing that he was
the sole caretaker of his son, I said, “Well, bring the form
to my administrative office. I’ll sign it and I’ll fax it in for you.” He took the two buses to my office, dropped off the form, went back home to take care of his son … I got to the office, and what did I find
next to the big “X” on the form? The word “applicant.” He needed to sign the form. And so now I had to have him
take the two buses back to the office and sign the form so that
we could then fax it in for him. It completely changed
how I took care of him. I made sure that I always went over
instructions verbally with him. It also made me think about
all of the patients who receive reams and reams of paper spit out by our modern
electronic health record systems, explaining their diagnoses
and their treatments, and wondering how many people
actually can understand what’s on those pieces of paper. Health care in the United States assumes
that you have a working telephone and an accurate address. The proliferation
of inexpensive cell phones has actually helped quite a lot. But still, my patients run out of minutes, and their phones get disconnected. Low-income people often have
to move around a lot by necessity. I remember reviewing a chart of a woman
with an abnormality on her mammogram. That chart assiduously documents
that three letters were sent to her home, asking her to please
come in for follow-up. Of course, if the address isn’t accurate, it doesn’t much matter how many letters
you send to that same address. Health care in the United States assumes
that you have a steady supply of food. This is particularly
an issue for diabetics. We give them medications
that lower their blood sugar. On days when they don’t have enough food, it puts them at risk
for a life-threatening side effect of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Health care in the United States
assumes that you have a home with a refrigerator for your insulin, a bathroom where you can wash up, a bed where you can sleep without worrying about violence
while you’re resting. But what if you don’t have that? What if you live on the street, you live under the freeway, you live in a congregant shelter, where every morning
you have to leave at 7 or 8am? Where do you store your medicines? Where do you use the bathroom? How do you put your legs up
if you have congestive heart failure? Is it any wonder that providing people
with health insurance who are homeless does not erase the huge disparity between the homeless and the housed? Health care in the United States assumes
that you prioritize your health care. But what about all of you? Let me assume for a moment
that you’re all taking a medication. Maybe it’s for high blood pressure. Maybe it’s for diabetes or depression. What if tonight you had a choice: you could have your medication
but live on the street, or you could be housed in your home
but not have your medication. Which would you choose? I know which one I would choose. This is just a graphic example
of the kinds of choices that low-income patients
have to make every day. So when my doctors
shake their heads and say, “I don’t know why that patient
didn’t keep his follow-up appointments,” “I don’t know why she didn’t go
for that exam that I ordered,” I think, well, maybe her ride didn’t show, or maybe he had to work. But also, maybe there was something
more important that day than their high blood pressure
or a screening colonoscopy. Maybe that patient was dealing
with an abusive spouse or a daughter who is pregnant
and drug-addicted or a son who was kicked out of school. Or even maybe they were riding
their bicycle through an intersection and got hit by a truck, and now they’re using a wheelchair
and have very limited mobility. Obviously, these things also happen
to middle-class people. But when they do, we have resources that enable us
to deal with these problems. We also have the belief that we
will live out our normal lifespans. That’s not true for low-income people. They’ve seen their friends
and relatives die young of accidents, of violence, of cancers that should have
been diagnosed at an earlier stage. It can lead to a sense of hopelessness, that it doesn’t really matter what you do. I know I’ve painted a bleak picture
of the care of low-income patients. But I want you to know
how rewarding I find it to work in a safety net system, and my deep belief is that we can
make the system responsive to the needs of low-income patients. The starting point has to be
to meet patients where they are, provide services without obstacles and provide patients what they need — not what we think they need. It’s impossible for me
to take good care of a patient who is homeless and living on the street. The right prescription
for a homeless patient is housing. In Los Angeles, we housed 4,700 chronically
homeless persons suffering from medical illness,
mental illness, addiction. When we housed them, we found
that overall health care costs, including the housing, decreased. That’s because they had
many fewer hospital visits, both in the emergency room
and on the inpatient service. And we gave them back their dignity. No extra charge for that. For people who do not have
a steady supply of food, especially those who are diabetic, safety net systems are experimenting
with a variety of solutions, including food pantries
at primary care clinics and distributing maps of community
food banks and soup kitchens. And in New York City, we’ve hired a bunch of enrollers to get our patients into
the supplemental nutrition program known as “food stamps” to most people. When patients and doctors
don’t understand each other, mistakes will occur. For non-English-speaking patients, translation is as important
as a prescription pad. Perhaps more important. And, you know, it doesn’t
cost anything more to put all of the materials
at the level of fourth-grade reading, so that everybody can understand
what’s being said. But more than anything else,
I think low-income patients benefit from having a primary care doctor. Mind you, I think middle-class
people also benefit from having somebody
to quarterback their care. But when they don’t, they have others
who can advocate for them, who can get them that disability placard or make sure the disability
application is completed. But low-income people really need
a team of people who can help them to access the medical and non-medical
services that they need. Also, many low-income people
are disenfranchised from other community supports, and they really benefit from the care
and continuity provided by primary care. A primary care doctor
I particularly admire once told me how she believed
that her relationship with a patient over a decade was the only healthy relationship
that that patient had in her life. The good news is, you don’t
actually have to be a doctor to provide that special sauce
of care and continuity. This was really brought home to me
when one of my own long-term patients died at an outside hospital. I had to tell the other doctors
and nurses in my clinic that he had passed. But I didn’t know that
in another part of our clinic, on a different floor, there was a registration clerk who had developed a very special
relationship with my patient every time he came in for an appointment. When she learned three weeks later
that he had died, she came and found me
in my examining room, tears streaming down her cheeks, talking about my patient
and the memories that she had of him, the kinds of discussions that they had had
about their lives together. My patient had a hard life. He was by his own admission a gangbanger. He had spent a substantial
amount of time in prison. He suffered from a very serious illness. He was a drug addict. But despite all that,
he rarely missed a visit, and I like to believe that was because
he knew at our clinic that he was loved. When our health care systems have the same
commitment to low-income patients that that man had to us, two things will happen. First, the system will be responsive
to the needs of low-income people. It will speak their language,
it will meet their schedules, it will fulfill their needs. Second, we will be providing
the kind of care that we went into this profession to do — not just checking the boxes, but really taking care of those we serve. Thank you. (Applause)

About Bill McCormick

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100 thoughts on “What the US health care system assumes about you | Mitchell Katz

  1. Do people realise this video is showing care about PEOPLE ahead of MONEY? Where is the 50% dislike ratio from people FAR more concerned with the profitability of the world's sabbatean frankist governments and global corporations ahead of their own children's health and well being? I mean come on. Having ANY kind of empathy is just pure 100% communism right? What's wrong evil scum?

  2. Ok I agree, US has healthcare problems. But which country doesn't have some of these issues? Weather you are low income in US or low income in Australia, you still need a ride to the hospital or doctor clinic. Homeless people have the same issues in US or Canada or Europe. If you can't speak English in US, you are going to have even bigger problems in some parts of Europe. The first focus should be on having universal healthcare in US and making it accessible and affordable to all before we even start to segment the population and criticize how there needs are not being met.

  3. The health care system assumes you have a great insurance plan and alot of money. The problems start when you don't have both !

  4. Whats amazing with the US healthcare is that even tho it ranks 37th in the world, american doctors dont want to change a thing. Claiming its best in the wooooorld. I just heard a doctor defending it to death and claiming economic ruin for the entire US of Murca if they adopt the European system.

  5. Every healthcare system in the world has its issues.
    Never good enough…
    I have been all over the world… france.. belgium.. is the best but its making the countries go bankrupts.. but who cares when you are sick ?.. spain is completely free.. but low quality…

  6. The rain forests in Brazil could benefit by lessening the reams and reams of useless forms the government deems necessary to get by on. Repetitive bullshit that No One even reads. Someone needs to let Greta Thornburg know this. I, for once, would like to KNOW that a doctor or nurse or staff that I have been seeing for years could at least know my Primary Condition, and possibly at least consult my chart w/o me filling out complete repeat forms of said condition(s). i would also appreciate a like or three. Thank you.

  7. Someone once said…the fastest way to die is to go see an American Dr. Food for thought from a chronically ill person living in poverty with suicidal tendencies who has had hundreds of dr visits.

  8. I remember when I was poor.. this gentleman explaining how it is. But I also have to agree that you have to work hard in order to gain privileges. Healthcare is a very difficult situation… Some people are just not mentally suitable to maintain high paying jobs.

  9. Hello saudações 🇧🇷 Obrigada por compartilhar ótimos vídeos 👍🔔
    Uma abençoada quinta-feira 🙏 Love .

  10. What if your choice was to die or go to your doctor and die more slowly with great pain, side effects, and tremendous expense?

  11. I just enrolled for my MA degree last night. This talk really opened my eyes to the needs of those I'll be serving. Thank you for this invaluable lesson.

  12. Thanks for paying for our universal healthcare with those lovely marshall plan loans.

    Remember, your tax dollars are for universal healthcare abroad, not for you, because you swallow a bunch of aspirational bullshit instead, so they waste money on that massive army instead, well done! They clearly have zero respect for you as taxpayers.

  13. The profit-driven US health care system prioritizes sickness over the actual maintenance and cultivation of health.

    The rapacious US health care industry assumes everyone wants (and likes) private insurance instead of quality of care.

    This TED talk just adds more justification for the current US health care system to move over to a single payer program that finally guarantees health care to every individual as a right, not a privilege.

  14. My grandfather passed away this year on valentines day he had fallen and hurt his hip he went through surgery successfully 2 weeks of him being in the health rehab we get a call to go to the emergency room we get there he was punctured by a catheter and was dying he was very dehydrated from what the emergency room told us he past away later that day my mother had stayed overnight with him in the hospital during surgery and rehab the last week he was in rehab she started going back to work while I was taking care of my great aunt… After he passed we tried to seek help with what we could do no lawyer would take the case because he's past life expectancy this in Fort Worth Texas downtown Harris Methodist btw so ive lost my grandfather that raised me and its not worth anyones time

  15. If these people just had a basic income. A UBI for example.
    That wouldn't solve all their problems, but would help SO much.

  16. I hear people mocking our so-called (and inaccurately so) "SOCIALIST" healthcare system (it's nationalised – funded by citizens and free at the point of service, that is NOT even remotely connected to socialism) here in the UK, but it negates many of these abhorrent indignities, medical debt, bankruptcy etc… how on earth are you supposed to recover from a serious illness when you're in a state of extreme stress and anxiety because you're worried about making your family homeless because you were unlucky and got a disease? Private insurance companies cause havoc here managing car insurance, all their unfair, dishonest, law-bending behavior, trickery, dishonesty, bullying, manipulation to avoid their obligations… greed and profits should not be part of a healthcare system, it's a huge conflict of interest between corporations and patients, hence a 3rd party (gov body needs to manage it – that should be as clear as day)…. totally immoral and 3rd world regressive in my opinion, you guys are the chaps with the messed up system, not us.

  17. This is such an important topic to discuss and highlight, especially to health employees. We often get consumed in our work and easily frustrated about day to day things within out facilities. we need to remind ourselves to keep the mindset, discussed by Dr.KAtz ,with every single patient and make sure they leave our facilities, comfortable with the help they received , will make worlds of differences to their health outcomes. as healthcare employees , other than treat , we need to educated our patients , in order to help them make the best decisions.

  18. The healthcare system I worked for hired a CEO from a hotel chain who then created a business model that tried to treat hospitals like hotels. We even called our patients "customers" or "guests" at one point for half a year, (behind closed doors) before someone with some sense turned it back. Or, perhaps more likely, a patient heard themselves refered to as a customer and complained. In the end it was a meaningless paint job, the higher ups still treat hospitals like hotels and patients like hotel guests.

    Edit: If you're wondering why that's a problem, it's because the investors who were calling the shots poured millions into cosmetic renovations to attract customers, and the way to make up the cost was to cut patient spending and increase prices. You can imagine how hospital cosmetic appearance, cost of medical care and number of impressed investors went up while quality of care went down. Preventable deaths also went up, though that was always put on the workers and doctors, not the constant supply shortages, overworked "hotel staff" and patients that couldn't comply with medical instructions due to their low incomes smashing to pieces against our high prices.

  19. Clean up our cities. Deport and exclude all illegal immigrants. We can't have prosperity for all Americans if we allow 100% unrestricted immigration. – TAV

  20. Here in Puerto Rico 🇵🇷 when I was young we had a great hospital that provided free health care for anyone and they took care of you the same day !!! Now we have to wait days to see a primary doctor just to get a letter to see a specialist which will see you in a month if you are lucky 🍀 and if you work and have just enough to pay rent food gas and electricity you still have to pay doctor fees even if it means you have to become a beggar and ask for hand outs !!! It is so degrading !!! America did that to Puerto Rico 🇵🇷 for their own self gain in riches !!! America corrupts everything is touches !!! The only person who is helping us now is POTUS Donald J Trump !!! Where were the lousy Clintons and Obama’s ??? They were running America and Puerto Rico 🇵🇷 into the ground !!! Trump for 2020 !!! ❤️❤️❤️👍👍👍♥️♥️♥️

  21. The Federal government assumes States will comply with federal law. If States complied with ADA laws, many of the needs you mention would be met for persons with disabilities.

  22. The US Healthcare system is what you get when you make short term profits the norm and monopolized businesses the law.

  23. Thank you! Unfortunately too many people are so self-centered and narrow-minded, they simply cannot put themselves in other people's shoes and see things from others' viewpoints and imagine that things may not be for others as it is for themselves. And it's not just about health-care, but in general. Far too many people are unable to think of or consider other scenarios and explanations. It's nice to see that some do. 👍

  24. AMEN!!!! THANK YOU. I feel like most doctors need a reality check about the realities of lower-income life. Thank you thank you thank you

  25. Our social safety net system in the US is utterly broken. It needs recreation from the ground up with a modern and permanently funded system that includes tons of social workers and resources to lift up anyone whose life takes a turn for the worse. We also need to incorporate mechanisms to prevent people that are in free fall from hitting rock bottom and to allow anyone to attempt to climb upwards from poverty towards self sufficiency if they choose to. We have the money to do it. We just lack the political will. The greatest nation on earth with a massive GDP and we still have hungry children, sick people that have no healthcare, and people dying in the streets.

    When the social contract starts letting the bottom fall out of society, other, far more expensive problems arise. The country also begins a slow decline since a strong and healthy middle class that includes as much of the population as possible is what makes economies run since you then have everybody buying your product, can find people to make your product, and have the wide talent pool to have innovation improve products and invent new ones. This is what made the USA a great nation and a super power on the world stage. We can have this again, it would just take some really small changes and time to repair the damage to our society.

  26. Low income people do not live as well or for as long as people with high incomes do. And I'm going to remedy this injustice. With your money.

  27. They don't assume anything!
    They have a generalized checklist that they know peoplesheeple will be categorized and defined by, and then couple that with what's trending at the time or what new concoctions pharmaceutical companies have invented that they want to use in a unanimous Perpetual series of test groups… and all the work has been done for them by the people that pay the ultimate prices.
    It's not much different in that way then the system of government that exist for law enforcement and regulation sue the DMV…… or the tax collector's office or Healthcare institutions.
    WakeyWakey 🙂

  28. This only proves how stupid the US is. Glad to be European, if sth goes wrong you are taken care of, the rock bottom here is asking your country to help you out. We all pay for the certainty.

  29. 45,000 people die per year from preventable causes due to lack of insurance in the U.S.
    500,000 people declare bankruptcy due to medical bills.
    1 in 10 people are not taking prescribed meds due to cost.

    For this we pay considerably more per person than any other country.

  30. I can not imagine to live in a country where you cant get off from work and you loose the money for this day when youre ill.
    In germany, where we have the "evil" socialistic healthcare, you get youre complete paycheck for the month and you dont have to work when you have to go to the doctor or if you are not able to work
    After 6 weeks without working you still get, i believe it is 70% or something like that, from youre normal paycheck.
    When you get ill, you dont have to worry about surviving like in america. Thats one of many reasons i would never want to live in america.

    I love those socialistic part of our democracy! They simply and only help us.
    I can not understand why so many people in america doesnt want a system like we have, which is obviously way better if you are in the middle clss or below.

  31. There are people who killed themselves rather than put their families in debt after they got cancer. That’s the system we have now.

  32. Don't even think about having a rare neuromuscular disease in the US. First you are crazy then untreatable but a snide office note can deny disability sending you into poverty. EPIC health care over evidence based care is the norm

  33. USA healthcare is awful because it is profit based rather than care based. Before it became profit based it was the best in the world. Before our culture and society became solely profit focused we were the best at almost everything. Remember?

  34. This issue is not isolated to the us – I’m a healthcare worker in Australia, where we have a free medical system for all Australians but we also struggle with similar issues with the social and cultural situations of patients.

  35. We have embraced the madness we call a "healthcare system".
    Now when someone comes along and wants to remake it into something that is actually better, we think they are crazy!
    Our entire media refuses to send one single reporter, or journalist, to do a piece on the matter. We are actively being deceived and we don't even know it….

  36. This man is a TRUE healer! Our system could benefit from CARERS at every point of contact EVERY patient makes. It costs nothing but love.

  37. There is an MRI place blocks from my house. The last time I got one, my insurance company required me to drive to one 45 minutes away. What if I didn't have a car? And it took a half a day off work instead of just an hour.

  38. Okay, except some of his claims and arguments that are true and very much important to be solved, I think that most things he accused of the system are things that can not be done because they are either of little significance or even things that no other health system, even European ones, can do anything about them.

  39. The health system screws everyone lets be realistic, low income, middle class, homeless, immigrants, in few words we live in a culture full of judgmental people, the way you look, how much money they assumed you make/have (to cover for service, and other medical expenses) type of insurance you have, if you are a person of color(👩🏽👨🏾👳🏿‍♂️🧕🏿🧓🏿👵🏽) or have an accent, because “that’s a give away”, as if that actually meant anything as far as whether the individual is here legally or illegally, or they treat them as if they were stupid, without realizing people whom might have an accent is sign of them being able to speak more than one language, since when is being able to speak more than one language consider stupid or makes someone stupid?, and the list goes on and on, and if you add to that the fact that most of not all drugs because they are drugs they are not medicine, medicine heals, it cures, drugs conceal, trick you into thinking you are better ,numb you, killing you slowly. Most doctors and nurses are not passionate about their jobs anymore, and I get I mean when you in industry where you as a healer are limited as far as what you are allowed to do for someone, when you just don’t care whether save a life or your next patient is here now and gone tomorrow, or whether they become addicted to the drugs you are prescribing them, you know we have a failed system that needs to be rebuilt from the ground up, just like the education system they both are limited, and broken, and last but not least I’m sorry but what this doctor is exposing is not an eye 👁 opener it doesn’t takes to be a doctor, nurse, medical professional to be aware and see what’s happening it takes one trip to an appointment to see how they treat people vs how they treat you sometimes you are in the other end sometime you might be the spectator, and others you might be that corrupted doctor/institution abusing of the lack or you patients insurance. Bottom line we need to take over our health, learn about our very individual,unique body and try to better our diets, use natural alternatives, and don’t even start with alternative medicine is bs it doesn’t work blah blah, keep consuming those lies if you like, those lies are the same lies that keep most people sick, and addicted, yes it is a lifestyle, you have to make major changes and yes it can be expensive and they want to keep it expensive, they make it expensive is more expensive to have a healthy diet that will make you and keep you healthy And one that will slowly kill you, we need to change and keep moving forward from what’s not working anymore, we need unity, and EMPATHY we need to start caring more about one another only together we can make a change that will be felt to improve our life and the one of those around us, what we all need is obvious, is the getting there that scares most

  40. I've heard that traditionally Chinese doctors only got paid when the patient was well. They didn't get paid when the patient was sick

  41. I worked a job that screwed my mental health so much that I ended up in urgent care 4 times in six months from physical symptoms caused by my anxiety. Unfortunately they don't have a prescription for "mental health days," and thats why I do doordash now. It pays just as well and I don't end up puking with anxiety over the idea that if I call off I might get fired.

  42. USA Healthcare puts everyone at risk.
    If someone who was poor got airborne really contagious virus. They would likely goto work spread the virus until such point that their illness reached such a point that they collapsed.

  43. Sadly now have government assuming what in best interest of patients. Labels apply to every patient, regardless of individual history.

  44. god bless the free market right? the best doctors dont even take insurance. they are cash only and solely work for the richest among us.

  45. I have medical and mental issues and my docs seem to be bouncing me back and forth like a pingpong and i seem to be getting fucking worse.smh . i fucking wondering why !!!smfh.

  46. Healthcare does nothing for middle class eather. Our Healthcare system is a evil and for profit system that's BS. This needs to stop now not tomorrow.

  47. I wish I could do more than just give this one like! Excellent talk!! Saving this to share with my fellow coworkers in healthcare! There is definitely a desperate need for more empathy and understanding in our healthcare system. It’s one of the most frustrating things I deal with on a personal level working within the current system.

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